Thursday, September 12, 2019

Freedom in Failure


A quick note from Emily: When I heard Jessica give her testimony at my church a few months ago, I found what she said so encouraging I just had to ask her to guest on my blog. After all, the truth she discovered as she drew closer to God in her own trial applies not only in her specific situation, but also to the rest of us who struggle sometimes with perfectionism and not feeling good enough. I hope you find her words (her first ever blog post!!) as encouraging as I did.



by Jessica Bradley

Failure.

That word is extremely negative. It means “lack of success.” If you look it up in the thesaurus, it gets paired with words like: breakdown, defeat, decay, inadequacy, loser, and wreck. Nothing with a positive connotation.

For several years, around the time when I became a new wife and mother, I let my failures define the way I viewed myself. That negative view of myself dragged me down into a depression that I didn’t know how to get out of.

It’s very popular right now to remind people to speak positive thoughts to themselves. We are told to look in the mirror and say, “You can do this! You are strong enough! Your failures don’t define you!” Everywhere we look, self-worth is measured by success. There are tons of different measurements and priorities for success, so if one doesn’t fit your lifestyle, find a different one! We are told that success is what matters, and failure is a lack of success. So keep trying! You can do this! Don’t give up!

While I was struggling with my own failures, that all sounded like a lie to me. Why tell myself, “I can do it!” when I knew I would fail again? Why lie and say, “I'm strong enough!” when I knew I was weak?

Thursday, September 5, 2019

Growing Roots

by Emily Conrad



I’ve heard the morbid take on bouquets that there’s no point in enjoying cut flowers because they’re all dead as soon as they are clipped from the plant. Though I didn't need much encouragement to enjoy cut flowers anyway, I picked one little flower recently that proved this perspective wrong.